In honor of Louis Blériot
      




Special Cable to The Washington Post

Special Cable to The Washington Post
London, July 25, 1909 —
Bleriot’s own account of his exploit, which will appear in the Daily Mail tomorrow, is graphic. He says:
“It is more important to be the first to cross the channel by aeroplane than to have won the prize of 1,000 pounds. I am more than happy that I have crossed the channel. At first I promised my wife that I would not make the attempt. Then I determined that if one failed I would be the first to come, and I am here…
“At 4:30 daylight had come… A light breeze from the southwest was beginning to blow. The air was clear. Everything was prepared. I was dressed in a khaki jacket lined with wool for warmth over tweed clothes and beneath my engineer’s suit of the blue cotton overalls. My close fitting cap was fastened over my head and my ears.
“I had neither eaten nor drunk anything. My thoughts were only upon the flight and my determination to accomplish it this morning. At 4:35 the signal is given, and in an instant I am in the air, my engine making 1,200 revolutions, almost its highest speed, in order that I may get quickly over the telegraph wires along the edge of the cliff. As soon as I am over the cliff I reduce my speed. There is now no need to force my engine. I begin my flight steady and sure toward the coast of England. I have no apprehensions, no sensations, pas du tout__
“I am alone. I can see nothing at all. For 10 minutes I am lost.
“It is a strange position to be alone,
Louis Bieriot just prior to departing Calais the morning of July 25, 1909.
unguided, without a compass in the air over the middle of the channel. I touch nothing. My hands and feet rest lightly on the levers. I let the aeroplane take its own course. I care not whither it goes. For 10 minutes I continue, neither rising nor falling nor turning, and then 20 minutes after I have left the French coast I see the green hills of Dover, the castle, and away to the west the spot where I intended to land.
“What can I do? It is evident that the wind has taken me out of my course. I am almost west of Margaret’s Bay, and I am going in the direction of the Goodwin Sands. Now it is time to attend to steering. I press a lever with my foot and turn easily toward the west, reversing the direction in which I am now traveling. Now, indeed, I am in difficulties, for the wind here by the cliffs is much stronger and my speed is reduced as I fight against it, yet my beautiful aeroplane responds —
“Once more I turn my aeroplane, and describing a half-circle I enter the opening and find myself again over dry land. Avoiding the red buildings on my right, I attempt a landing, but the wind catches me and whirls me around two or three times. At once I stop my motor, and instantly my machine falls upon the land from a height of 65 feet. In two or three seconds I am safe upon your shores. Soldiers in khaki run up, and a policeman and two of my compatriots are on the spot. They kiss my cheek. The conclusion of my flight overwhelms me. I have nothing to say, but accept the congratulations.
“Thus ended my flight across the channel. The flight could easily be done again. Should I do it? I think not. I have promised my wife that after a race for which I have entered I will fly no more.”
Special Cable to The Washington Post
London, July 25, 1909 —
Louis Bleriot just prior to departing Calais the morning of July 25, 1909

Louis Bleriot just prior to departing Calais the morning of July 25, 1909

Bleriot’s own account of his exploit, which will appear in the Daily Mail tomorrow, is graphic. He says:

“It is more important to be the first to cross the channel by aeroplane than to have won the prize of 1,000 pounds. I am more than happy that I have crossed the channel. At first I promised my wife that I would not make the attempt. Then I determined that if one failed I would be the first to come, and I am here…
“At 4:30 daylight had come… A light breeze from the southwest was beginning to blow. The air was clear. Everything was prepared. I was dressed in a khaki jacket lined with wool for warmth over tweed clothes and beneath my engineer’s suit of the blue cotton overalls. My close fitting cap was fastened over my head and my ears.
“I had neither eaten nor drunk anything. My thoughts were only upon the flight and my determination to accomplish it this morning. At 4:35 the signal is given, and in an instant I am in the air, my engine making 1,200 revolutions, almost its highest speed, in order that I may get quickly over the telegraph wires along the edge of the cliff. As soon as I am over the cliff I reduce my speed. There is now no need to force my engine. I begin my flight steady and sure toward the coast of England. I have no apprehensions, no sensations, pas du tout
“I am alone. I can see nothing at all. For 10 minutes I am lost.
“It is a strange position to be alone,
Louis Bieriot just prior to departing Calais the morning of July 25, 1909.
Unguided, without a compass in the air over the middle of the channel. I touch nothing. My hands and feet rest lightly on the levers. I let the aeroplane take its own course. I care not whither it goes. For 10 minutes I continue, neither rising nor falling nor turning, and then 20 minutes after I have left the French coast I see the green hills of Dover, the castle, and away to the west the spot where I intended to land.
“What can I do? It is evident that the wind has taken me out of my course. I am almost west of Margaret’s Bay, and I am going in the direction of the Goodwin Sands. Now it is time to attend to steering. I press a lever with my foot and turn easily toward the west, reversing the direction in which I am now traveling. Now, indeed, I am in difficulties, for the wind here by the cliffs is much stronger and my speed is reduced as I fight against it, yet my beautiful aeroplane responds —
“Once more I turn my aeroplane, and describing a half-circle I enter the opening and find myself again over dry land. Avoiding the red buildings on my right, I attempt a landing, but the wind catches me and whirls me around two or three times. At once I stop my motor, and instantly my machine falls upon the land from a height of 65 feet. In two or three seconds I am safe upon your shores. Soldiers in khaki run up, and a policeman and two of my compatriots are on the spot. They kiss my cheek. The conclusion of my flight overwhelms me. I have nothing to say, but accept the congratulations.
“Thus ended my flight across the channel. The flight could easily be done again. Should I do it? I think not. I have promised my wife that after a race for which I have entered I will fly no more.”

Centenary of crossing English Channel

On 25 July 1909, Louis Blériot was the first to pass a feat: crossing the English Channel by air. This adventure includes the field of aviation Issy, from 1907 to 1909. On the occasion of 100 years of crossing the English Channel by Louis Blériot, Plunge into this amazing story through a video interview of her grand-son (conducted on the occasion of the centenary of 1 km closed circuit) and a book .


Louis Bleriot
by issy92

Louis Blériot

Did you know? Louis Blériot has continued his research in aeronautics in Issy-les-Moulineaux, on the current heliport of Paris to improve his monoplane formula. Some years before his feat on 11 July 1907, at Issy, the new “mechanical bird” by Louis Blériot rises to 2m tall and flies over a thirty meter.

“There is 100 years old, Louis Blériot” (in french)

 Il y a 100 ans, Louis Blériot

Il y a 100 ans, Louis Blériot

A historical book of Henri Charpentier
As a pioneer of aeronautics, Louis Blériot, has a special place. It is said that he broke the wood. The reputation is not false, it was, in fact, fifty fall to develop his famous Blériot XI, the winner of the Channel. But what we said less, it was one of the few designers of airplanes to have increased from 1907, flights to test himself methodically different prototypes …

The City contributed to this work by tracing the performance of Louis Blériot in the territory of Issy. Because it was between 1907 and 1909, he continued, on the field of aviation Issy-les-Moulineaux, aeronautics research to improve its formula monoplane. The entire history of this fabulous french character is to discover in this book.

Centenary of his flight across the English Channel

louis-bleriot-1909

louis bleriot 1909

1909 was a time where the aircraft was still in diapers. Have spent a few years shy but momentous flight originating in the global aviation, led by the American brothers Orville and Wilbur Wright on December 17, 1903 at Kitty Hawk beach, and enthusiasts of the conquest of the sky with airplanes propelled by motors struggle to go back ever further away.
Existing aircraft then have nothing to do with their successors.

Machines are usually produced by its own pilots, just light frames, coated fabric, fitted with engines of very low power, low speed and limited range. They also lack the most basic tools for navigation.

But after 1909 and the Daily Mail newspaper has offered £ 1,000 over who first natural barrier that separates centuries in France United Kingdom: the English Channel.

Struggling to achieve a brilliant pupil of Wilbur Wright, the aristocratic Russian ancestry French Charles de Lambert, and Hubert Latham favorite.

Less obvious, but with much determination as his rivals for the challenge, competition entering Louis Blériot, a former manufacturer of automotive lanterns become builder of aircraft.

Since 1900, Gallo has built and tested prototypes of their own design. The first success is achieved in October 1906 when flying between two locations in a French Blériot VIII, 40 horsepower.

The offer of the British newspaper led him to design a single-engine Anzani 25 horsepower. He made a voyage to test a cross, which lasts almost 37 minutes and gives the hope of winning.

The Blériot XI is ready for its creator to be the first attempt to cross the English Channel.

But rivals are trying to exploit and awarded the first prize.

Favorite Latham fails in his attempt when you turn off the engine of his plane and Antionette IV falls into the sea. The aristocratic Lambert crashes during a test.

Comes July 25, 1909.

Louis Blériot walk with the aid of crutches due to burns suffered in a walk in one of its flight tests.

Bleriot_XI-1MDespite this disadvantage, the prevailing weather and the pleas of his wife Alice because desist, feels like its time and it invades the irrepressible desire to go back on the canal

The Blériot XI off to glory at 4:35 near the port of Calais. The low wind speed confirms that the pilot is expected and the opportunity to direct his monoplane the British coast.

Soon the boat leaves behind Escopette, which tries to escort Alice, foreseeing that his reckless husband might suffer an accident.

Without any navigation instrument, flying at 64 kilometers per hour and 76 meters on the choppy sea, Louis determined to overcome the moving barrier is unknown. In the ten minutes was in the middle of nowhere, alone and lost “he said later.

The engine is overheating of the monoplane, but the rain helps keep providential in an acceptable temperature and not fail.

Spend the time and the pilot currency summits near Dover, in a mixture of excitement and concern. We know close to achieving its purpose, but far from the planned landing site.

In this vital moment, the front is intended to prevent strong winds fame. Blériot flies against him and find a clear place in the countryside where he puts his airplane, but still the air battle over and over again impossible.

With determination, Louis gives rest to the 25 horsepower Anzani’s plane touches the ground and having witnessed the feat as two of his countrymen, as well as several British soldiers and a policeman.

Just 36 minutes were enough to Blériot became one of the most famous pioneers of aviation.

The trip on the English Channel, that July 25, 1909, marked indelibly on the future of the emerging global aviation. Contributed to multiply the efforts of designers, manufacturers and pilots to fly ever faster, higher and farther, as well as government and convince the public of the promising benefits of aviation.

Is that the legacy for the posterity of Louis Blériot. That the world pays worthy tribute to the centenary of his flight across the English Channel.

Centenary of the crossing of English Channel

On July 25 the fulfillment of a century since the French Louis Blériot crossed first achieved success with the English Channel aboard the Blériot XI, which has been restored for the exhibition opened in Paris in honor of the feat.

Bleriot-XI-sur-DoverResearch, technical and technological innovations associated with the French pilot is the main theme of the shows until October 18th organized by the Museum of Arts et Métiers, which since October 1909 has enabled the Blériot XI make the gesture.

Original objects related to the crossing and the industrial adventure of Louis Blériot (1872-1936), along with pictures and movies of the era, make up the exhibition, plus a flight simulator funded by the European consortium EADS, said the director of communication museum, Marie-Laetitia Bucchini.

Louis Blériot was able to cover the 38 kilometers separating England from mainland Europe, in response to the challenge launched by the British newspaper Daily Mail, which promised a prize of £ 1,000 who managed to pass through it.

With 37 years old when he had made the journey from Calais (France) and Dover (United Kingdom) in 37 minutes, Blériot, an engineer by profession, had already made a fortune through his business of automobile headlights, which enabled it to finance their aeronautical research.

Adventurous attitude combined with the prudence that showed a man of business, which made him “a unique figure of the time,” than his contemporaries pioneers of aviation, he said.

“His journey from English Channel marked the start of the industrialization of aviation”

The monoplane, designed by himself, can be observed in the sample to be suspended under the dome of the church museum Arts et Métiers, where he appreciates the difficulty crossing due to the fragility of the crude unit, 300 kilos of weight and only 8.5 meters long.

The structure of the Blériot XI, steel and wood, complete with curved wings, made of cloth and covered with rubber, for the design of which is believed to have sought help at the French engineer Gustave Eiffel, in addition to the propeller blade consists of two .

Created for the occasion, an aircraft flight simulator, one of the most important attractions of the exhibition, said the organization, you can observe and test the technical characteristics and the main conditions of the original pilot, and relive the experience of pilot French from the controls.

The celebrations of the centenary of the crossing of English Channel to extend the town of Cambrais (north), birthplace of Louis Blériot, which has organized several exhibitions and conferences to commemorate the saga of one of its more illustrious neighbors.

Aviation pioneer, Louis Blériot

We speak of an apparatus French aviation pioneer, Louis Blériot was its builder and completed its factory in Neuilly near Paris, is a monoplane that his drive was equipped with a motor of 28 hp REP had their peaks at about 60 km / h speed and a height of close to 80 meters, which was released at the International Aerospace Exhibition in Paris in 1908, although in fact it received its baptism in the air for months February 1909.

The English Daily Mail newspaper, in 1908 offered a prize of 500 pounds for the first aviator to reach across the English Channel (Calais) and in 1909 took up this offer and doubled their number, 1,000 pounds, which made it Several pilots attempted this feat, then so was flying over the peninsula area, it was not easy to try on the open sea, since they were very frequent engine failures and it was more advisable to view a landing at any seeding and receive aid rather than a amerizaje do not know where.

FlyBleriotFlyEager to participate in this event is necessary to make changes in his Blériot XI, replace your original engine for a 25 hp Anzini propelling propeller Chauvierre, this new engine was built with a tricylinder holes in the walls of their cylinders at their most under the motion of the piston thus obtained are not overheating and improved leakage, it was getting an engine that will ensure at least 45 minutes to fly smoothly, as they felt that at that time could win this competition .

On June 26, 1909, a test of his new airplane and set a new European record of staying in flight with 36 minutes and 55 seconds. Convinced skills gained his plane moved to the town of Calais and on July 25 of that year, 04.35 hours when they were perceived that the wind speed and direction were correct as the flight begins , the same route out of the boat harbor “Escopette” that would support but little time and is only exceeded in the air by the waves of the Atlantic under their feet. Perceived overheating engine but a lucky rain helps to keep up. When you reach the 36 minutes of his journey in sight the peaks of Dover (England) made a final rectification of its course and landed on a plateau where he received two of his fellow soldiers and a policeman English. The prize was hers, had flown to 64 km / h and an altitude of 76 meters.

This airplane also noting other feats, the September 23, 1910 the Peruvian pilot of French origin Jorge Chavez managed to cross the Alps for the first time on a flight that originated in Brig (Switzerland) and a destination in Domodossola (Italy).

This model came to make no less than 5600 copies which gave the air units of France, England and other countries. Following the crossing of Calais by Louis Blériot, England found their weak defense by air.

The first to fly a biplane powered motor: Wilbur and Orville Wright

In 1903 the brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright were the first to fly a biplane powered motor, the stunt, originally a short flight takes in the U.S. December 17, Kitty Hawk (North Carolina) and mark the beginning of aviation.
For the first time a mind heavier than air and an explosion engine achieves an ascent flight and controlled descent. The achievement was made possible after years of testing and over a thousand thanks to their inventive efforts and skills of mechanics. Was the result of matching a motor to achieve low power and low weight and experience to capitalize on the lift and aerodinamia tested during the last decade.

First to Fly

First to Fly

The significance of the achievement of the Wright originally going unnoticed for most of the news media publication or rejecting in some cases such as the Associated Press come weeks later as a brief mention in their reports but without major international comments.
His steps will be followed soon by other pioneers, but only at the end of the decade, the aircraft will make its final push to start building the first military aircraft.
Attempts to register the patent of his invention to the Patent Office of the U.S. Wright forced to invest increasing resources and legal, over the next three years. The potential military uses that are beginning to loom for aircraft and major economic interests at stake do not appear to be unrelated to the difficulties they face.
In 1905 the Wright show in Dayton, Ohio, with their Flyer III model for a reliable aircraft to fly for 38 minutes setting a new world record time in flight.
The fledgling interim aviation in France is the setting for other resonant progress, there is where Wilbur and Orville Wright get the recognition they are initially reluctant in their own country.

Bleriot XI a mythical plane

bleriot XI

With a length of 8 meters, the fuselage of the Blériot XI was built in oak and poplar cross string piano.

BLERIOT XI C

The wings of a scale of 7.80 meters, were structured by two massive beams. Each wing is secured by steel straps to a cabin in central steel tube, all the wings were covered with cloth.

BLERIOT-WHEELS-REARbleriot-wheels

The landing gear wire gauge is equipped with shock absorbers to sandows resting on three wheels and steerable radio.

BLERIOT-MOTOR

The 3-cylinder engine developing 20 hp Anzani

BLERIOT-Propeller

moved bladed wooden propeller Chauviére diameter of 2.08 meters

In order to fly, with a weight of 300 kg, the device reached a speed of 58 km / h.
BLERIOT-XI
Crossing the Channel was an economic world and the French state was immediately ordered 100 copies.

PDF: Detailed Description of Bleriot XI (in french)

Luois Blériot, history of an obsession

Blériot began his lifelong obsession with aviation when he visited a local exhibition and saw Clement Ader’s early, bat-wing shaped plane. Inspired by the strange looking craft, he began to build, test, and crash numerous planes of his own over the next nine years. Rather than follow one type of design for his planes, Blériot worked by trial and error – working first with gliders, then box-kite biplanes, and finally with monoplanes. By 1909, with his finances drained, Blériot finally produced a plane which didn’t immediately crash, the Blériot XI.
In a marketing ploy to increase its circulation, the “Daily Mail” newspaper of London offered a cash prize to the first pilot to fly across the English Channel – a risky proposition at the time. Blériot sensed this was his golden opportunity. Even though his plane had never run for more than 20 minutes – about half of the Channel’s 22-mile distance – the pilot remained undaunted.
Blériot had two fierce rivals for this title. The first was the daring Hubert Lathan, an Englishman who had made France his home. Loved by both the French as well as the English, he was favored to win. The other flyer, Charles de Lambert, was a Russian aristocrat with French roots – not to mention one of Wilbur Wright’s best students. In July of 1909, the three competitors each arrived on the shores of Calais, France. Lathan had arrived first and attempted a crossing on July 19th. Six miles from shore, though, he developed engine trouble and was forced to make a sea landing. Meanwhile, Lambert suffered a major crash of his own during a test flight, forcing him to withdraw from the race. Blériot, himself, experienced the misfortune of a badly burned foot when he a petrol line broke during one of his trial runs. But Blériot persevered.
Louis Blériot stands next to his plane after completing his historic crossing of the English Channel on July 25, 1909.
While Lathan was regrouping, Blériot watched the weather. At dawn on July 25th, he took off for England despite blustery winds and his injured foot. By the time Lathan’s camp realized that Blériot was not making a test run but attempting the crossing, it was too late to chase him. With no compass to guide him, Blériot beat the odds and managed to somehow successfully cross the Channel. He immediately gained worldwide fame. His rival, Hubert Lathan, even re-attempted Blériot’s flight four days later, only to again smash his plane into the ocean when the engine failed.
While Blériot’s flight was not the longest of its time, his achievement was nonetheless historic. His crossing captured the world’s attention and continued to popularize the field of aviation. After his famous flight, Blériot formed a plane company which became quite successful, first manufacturing copies of his Blériot XI, and later producing the S.P.A.D. fighter flown by the Allies during WWI. Louis Blériot would continue to make contributions to the field of aviation until his death on August 2, 1936.
Louis Blériot began his lifelong obsession with aviation when he visited a local exhibition and saw Clement Ader’s early, bat-wing shaped plane. Inspired by the strange looking craft, he began to build, test, and crash numerous planes of his own over the next nine years. Rather than follow one type of design for his planes, Blériot worked by trial and error – working first with gliders, then box-kite biplanes, and finally with monoplanes. By 1909, with his finances drained, Blériot finally produced a plane which didn’t immediately crash, the Blériot XI.
bleriot and his plane at dover
The “Daily Mail” newspaper of London offered a cash prize of 1000L to the first pilot to fly across the English Channel – a risky proposition at the time. Blériot sensed this was his golden opportunity. Even though his plane had never run for more than 20 minutes – about half of the Channel’s 22-mile distance – the pilot remained undaunted.
Blériot had two fierce rivals for this title. The first was the daring Hubert Lathan, an Englishman who had made France his home. Loved by both the French as well as the English, he was favored to win. The other flyer, Charles de Lambert, was a Russian aristocrat with French roots. In July of 1909, the three competitors each arrived on the shores of Calais, France. Lathan had arrived first and attempted a crossing on July 19th. Six miles from shore, though, he developed engine trouble and was forced to make a sea landing. Meanwhile, Lambert suffered a major crash of his own during a test flight, forcing him to withdraw from the race. Blériot, himself, experienced the misfortune of a badly burned foot when he a petrol line broke during one of his trial runs. But Blériot persevered.
Louis Blériot stands next to his plane after completing his historic crossing of the English Channel on July 25, 1909.
the bleriot memorialWhile Lathan was regrouping, Blériot watched the weather. At dawn on July 25th, he took off for England despite blustery winds and his injured foot. By the time Lathan’s camp realized that Blériot was not making a test run but attempting the crossing, it was too late to chase him. With no compass to guide him, Blériot beat the odds and managed to somehow successfully cross the Channel. He immediately gained worldwide fame. His rival, Hubert Lathan, even re-attempted Blériot’s flight four days later, only to again smash his plane into the ocean when the engine failed.
While Blériot’s flight was not the longest of its time, his achievement was nonetheless historic. His crossing captured the world’s attention and continued to popularize the field of aviation. After his famous flight, Blériot formed a plane company which became quite successful, first manufacturing copies of his Blériot XI, and later producing the S.P.A.D. fighter flown by the Allies during WWI. Louis Blériot would continue to make contributions to the field of aviation until his death on August 2, 1936.

Biography of Louis Blériot

(Cambrai, France, 1872-Paris, 1936) French Aviator and engineer. Engineer by profession, was amassing a small fortune to design and sell various car accessories such as lamps and other accessories. After experimenting with sliders in 1900 designed a first prototype of an apparatus equipped with motor with a power of two horses, which successfully removed, although flight only traveled a few meters.

Bleriot V january 1907

Bleriot V january 1907

In 1906, in partnership with other pioneers and Levavasseur Voisin, Blériot IV built a biplane much more elaborate, however, failed to rise. Two years later introduced a queue on the Blériot VIII, a standard half ton of weight and an engine of forty horse achieved in October of uninterrupted travel route between the small towns of Toury and Artenay.

The result of this success was the Blériot XI, a monoplane with twenty-eight horses that on July 25, 1909, conducted the first flight with the engine from the French port of Calais to the British town of Dover, which became the first man who crossed the English Channel aboard an Air Self ingenuity. The feat, which toured the story world like wildfire, he won a prize of 1000 pounds issued by a British newspaper.
During the First World War contributed to the French war effort, first through prototypes based on their own designs, and later in collaboration with the aircraft factory Spade, whose aircraft were involved in the big air contest. Conflict ended, he founded his own aviation company and made numerous contributions to the development of civil aeronautics.

The old dream of flying like the birds began to be realized in the late eighteenth century

The old dream of flying like the birds began to be realized in the late eighteenth century, thanks to the balloon of the Montgolfier brothers. Just over a century later, the man managed to fly a plane. From the time you go remote, myths and legends speak of men who flew like birds.

The first flight experiment real, decisive for the development of air navigation, was the brothers Jacques and Joseph Montgolfier in June 1783. His ship was a huge balloon with passengers who reached the height of 2,000 m. The principle of the invention was simple: fire under a balloon light material. c balloon is inflated and rose, because the hot air inside was lighter than the surrounding air. The news of the Montgolfier encouraged other attempts. On November 21 1783 a young nobleman of Pilatre Rozier was the first passenger in Paris from the air in a balloon that had a burner. A few days later, the physicist Jacques-Alexandre Charles repeated the experiment with a more technically advanced, which i used hydrogen instead of hot air: he was born on gas balloon. The dirigible As the balloon did not allow a management of the world, began to project a dirigible craft, driven by propellers. This was performed after he invented the gasoline engine, much more powerful and lighter than the vapor. The first dirigible flight took a significant place on Lake Constance (Germany) in June 1900. Its inventor was the German Count von Zeppelin Fcrdinand. Since then, the airship had spread and was quite used for military purposes in the First World War. Became a symbol of technical progress, but was soon abandoned because of the tragedies caused by the use of hydrogen, a flammable gas. Flying machines The study of the aerodynamics of the airplane and the idea had many predecessors in France and England in the first half of the nineteenth century. Attempted to build a rigid-wing vehicle, driven by a propeller engine light, whose flight is based on four different forces. The combination of these forces could overcome those pushing it towards the ground.

The first airplane was efficient work of the American brothers Orville and Wilbur Wright. Having long studied the failures of their predecessors, December 17, 1903 managed to fly for the first time ever, a machine driven by its own strength and able to travel without losing speed. It was a biplane with wings of an opening of 12.5 m and two drivers (one above and one in the queue), which had a gasoline engine of 70 kg and 12 horsepower. Since then the aircraft had a rapid development

Frontal view of a Bleriot XI

Frontal view of a Bleriot XI

throughout the world. On July 25, 1909 the French invented by Louis Blériot’s wing, succeeded in flying across the English Channel and in 1927, Captain Charles Lindberg (USA). in his monoplane Spirit of St. Louis made crossing the Atlantic in a solo flight that lasted 33 hours.

Jets and rockets

Until the end of World War II, the mechanical flight was substantially unchanged from that in 1903, the Wright brothers made the first airplane to fly in the fifty years following major improvements were made to the new aircraft. However, the engines and the flight were the same as the first prototype. Only the principle of propulsion by reaction with both engines and jet propulsion rocket engine, introduced a fundamental change. The principle that there is a bomb on a moving reaction was known since antiquity: if you leave air, steam or other gas contained in a container, a hole, the gust of air expelled gives the object momentum (a good example is a balloon that suddenly deflates). We had to wait until the technology progressed pond oxidant fuel in many areas before they can apply this law of physics on the fly. In order for an engine based on this kind of momentum was efficient, it was necessary to construct a building with materials resistant to high speeds and temperatures.

Jets

The first to patent a jet engine was the French engineer René Lorin, Airplanes in 1911 driven by such engines were built shortly before World War II in Germany, Italy and England. The most important was produced in 1941 by the English aviator Frank Whittle, who had planned a decade earlier. The aircraft did not need propellers Whittle because, on the engine pistons and cylinders were replaced by a combustion chamber and a turbine, with great violence to expel gas from the back of the tube reactor, the plane was moving. With this system, implemented prior to the war planes after the first English attempt at the flight line, can reach speeds previously unimaginable.

Helicopter

The idea of a vertical takeoff aircraft is old, and many inventors designed and tested such machines in the course of history. However. the first who managed to build a helicopter efidente. ie. an aircraft driven by a rotor (propeller revolutions making pallet horizontal from the ground), were the technicians of the German aeronautical industry Focke, 1940. As their work is not known until the end of the Second War, the invention of the helicopter is generally attributed to the Soviet engineer Igor Sikorsky. who built his prototype, the XR-4 for the U.S. Army in 1941. Because it is able to stand motionless in the air and requires minimal space for takeoff and landing, the helicopter is extremely useful for many practical purposes.

Cross the English Channel using a single jet-propelled wing

A Swiss adventurer will today make a record-breaking attempt to become the first person to fly solo across the English Channel using a single jet-propelled wing. 

First man cross channel in jet

First man cross channel in jet

Yves Rossy, known as Fusionman, will jump from a plane more than 8,200ft (2,500m) above ground, then fire up jets on his homemade wing and soar across one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes.
The 49 year old is hoping to make the flight from Calais to Dover  just after 1pm BST after suffering a setback earlier this week when poor weather conditions postponed his attempt by a day.

Rossy, a former military pilot, aims to trace the route of French aviation pioneer Louis Bleriot, who became the first person to fly across the Channel in a plane 100 years ago.

Flying at speeds approaching 125mph, it is expected that the 22-mile televised flight across the Channel should take Rossy around 12 minutes to complete.

To achieve the feat, Rossy must overcome significant challenges, not least the container ships that will be passing through the sea.

In an interview earlier this week, he said: “If I calculate everything right, I will land in Dover. But if I get it wrong, I take a bath.”

Rossy – a pilot with Swiss International Air Lines -will review safety measures before take-off in Calais, especially important as his jet-propelled wing needs to be ignited while still inside the plane.

He has never flown for longer than 10 minutes. And his wing weight and measurements must be incredibly precise, with even the addition of a tiny camera possibly affecting how long he can stay in the air.

Over the past few months, he has been fine-tuning the wing’s design and performance and carried out several test flights in wind tunnels and the Swiss Alps.
His wing weighs about 55kg with fuel and includes four simple, kerosene-burning jet turbines to keep him airborne.

Created from a lightweight carbon composite, the wing has no steering devices, meaning Rossy will have to use his head and back to control the wing’s movement.

He will be outfitted with a special suit, helmet and parachute as part of the precautions to protect him from the jet turbines mounted just centimetres from him on the wing.

If the weather conditions turn out to be poor, another attempt at the crossing will take place tomorrow.

National Geographic Channel will broadcast the flight live around the world except France, Canada and Switzerland and will stream it live online at http://www.natgeotv.com/jetman

Louis Charles Joseph Bleriot

Our 1909 Louis Charles Joseph Blériot is a frail spindly looking monoplane, which has led a most adventurous life. The Bleriot in my life has flown the English Channel in both directions; the Catalina Channel; over the San Francisco-Oakland, Transbay Bridge; in England, Canada, France, and about half of the states in the United States.

Over the years it has served me in much the same reliable way as our versatile present-day aircraft, although I am sure it is responsible for giving me more gray hairs than all the business planes in the alphabet, from Alpha to Zebra.

Louis Bleriot was in many ways as interesting as the airplane. The son of a successful fabric manufacturer, he became a wealthy man in his own right and financed his experiments in aviation by the invention of a successful automobile headlight. Before the advanced design (for its day) that carried Bleriot across the Channel, there were some eight other largely unsuccessful experimental craft, ranging from cellular winged gliders to canard aircraft, most of which crashed, burned, or scattered themselves over the landscape. Until the advent of the 1909 model, Louis Bleriot’s major claim to frame seemed to be his ability to survive any and all accidents.

Bleriot was not only the originator of the monoplane design that is basic to every business aircraft manufacturer today, but he also originated streamlining of the fuselage; the engine placed forward, with the single tractor propeller; the rudder, elevator, and stabilizer placed on the aft part of the fuselage; and even a partially swiveling landing gear with a capability for crosswinds.

Bleriot XI

Bleriot XI

The basic Bleriot design was light and simple to maintain, as well as to easy to take apart or set up for flight. From the standpoint of the early exhibition pilots these were important factors, for the Bleriot could be made ready for flight in thirty minutes, as against six to eight hours for a Curtiss or Wright. Another factor was the advent of the 50-hp Gnome Rotary, which gave the Bleriot a tremendous edge because of its general reliability and low weight per horsepower.

The 1909 Bleriot, along with the rear-elevator Curtiss, were undoubtedly the two most widely copied aircraft prior to 1914. Literally hundreds of airplanes were built on farms and in backyards with nothing more to go on than photographs, the materials often being banana oil, mothers’ bed sheets, and slats form the fence. Because of the popularity of the Bleriot design and its very remarkable impact on the world (for it received as much publicity in its days as Linbergh’s flight twenty years later), many wealthy sportsmen bought them to use for business and pleasure. Adventurous barnstomers flew them all over known world, even as far as China and Tibet!

The Bleriot is a wire airplane, and without each wire being properly attached and safe-tied, it has about the strength of a fifteen cent grocery store kite. I carefully checked the flying cables, both at the bedsted (front fuselage frame) and at the wing, as well as the warp cables through the bottom walking beam and the wing, as well as the warp cables through the bottom walking beam and the wing, and above on the A frame. Then I checked the fuselage alignment by eye, including the landing gear sulky wheels and tires, tail surfaces, and control cables. With the aircraft ready for take-off, the engine idling nicely, and its lone instrument -the oil pressure gauge-showing fifty pounds, I grasped the spade-type grip and shoved the throttle forward. The tail was up in about 7 m ; the wind was steady twelve knots; temperature, 79 degrees; field elevation, 54 feet. I was airborne in about 55 m.

As I broke ground, a particularly nasty gust of wind dropped a wing, and for several seconds, full opposite stick rudder, and elevator were necessary to pick it up. I had forgotten what a job it was to always maintain the wings in a level attitude and the necessity of making only very flat skidding turns, mostly with rudder. In spite of a slow actual ground speed (about 44 to 48 mph), their is still no experience in my years of flying to equal the sick feeling you have when a wing goes down in gusty air and you head for the ground unable to pick up the wing in spite of full opposite control. A good deal of forward pressure is also required on the stick, for the Bleriots I have flown are all tail-heavy, and if one flies for more than ten minutes at a time, he has to keep shifting tired arms.

Flying with the camera ship required some prethought, for if the slipstream ever hit the Bleriot, it could go over on its back-which it did once with me. At the time I could only think of Adolph Pegoud, the Frenchman who made the world’s first loop in a Bleriot, and wonder why he didn’t suffer a coronary, for I am sure my heart missed a sizable number of beats.

After we finished taking the aerial photographs, I checked the Bleriot on stalls, which are deceptive, since it pays off with absolutely no warning, dropping a wing and forcing one to turn into the dropped wing to pick it up, the stall appears to be at about 25 to 27 mph. Beyond gentle turns, one is quite content to just fly along at about 40-odd mph and enjoy the air conditioned ride. There is no windshield for protection from the direct prop blast.

Landing can be either power on or power off. My choice is power off, with an extremely steep approach of about 30 percent nose down. One has only a very short flare-out, because there is no float with the inborn drag of a Bleriot. It lands smoothly and rolls to a stop on grass in about fifty feet. One must be very careful to land directly into the wind and pray for no sudden gusty crosswinds; the latter happened to me once; and one of the very weak main wheels collapsed under the side load. As the Bleriot ground to a stop, the windward wing rose into the air. I jumped out of the cockpit and grabbed the flying wires and promptly rose into the air with the wing. Only the additional weight of a startled airport attendant hanging on my feet brought both the Bleriot and me back to the ground again.

Louis Bleriot, with a typical French statement, once said before his famous Channel flight, “If I cannot walk, I’ll show the world I can fly.” But this pilot is not sure if he had to fly a Louis Bleriot very often, he might prefer to walk!

video Fly Bleriot Replica

On July 25 th, 2009 The aircraft in the video you are going to see will attempt to duplicate the flight Louis Bleriot made 100 years ago on the same date.

The first crossing of the English Channel by an aircraft.

First Fly English Channel – Louis Blériot

Blog about First Fly English ChannelLouis Blériot

Blériot had two rivals for the prize, both of whom failed to reach the goal. The first was Hubert Latham, a French national of English extraction. He was favored by both the United Kingdom and France to win. He had arrived first and attempted to fly across on 19 July of that year, but 10 km from the shore at Dover he developed engine trouble and was forced to make a sea landing. The other pilot, Charles de Lambert, was a Russian aristocrat with French ancestry, and one of Wilbur Wright’s students. However, Lambert was injured in a major crash during a test, forcing him to quit the competition. On July 25, 1909, the three rivals each arrived on the shores of Calais, France. Blériot had a badly burned foot when a gasoline line broke on his machine during one of his trial runs, although he did not withdraw.

Blériot had two rivals for the prize, both of whom failed to reach the goal. The first was Hubert Latham, a French national of English extraction. He was favored by both the United Kingdom and France to win. He had arrived first and attempted to fly across on 19 July of that year, but six miles (10 km) from the shore at Dover he developed engine trouble and was forced to make a sea landing. The other pilot, Charles de Lambert, was a Russian aristocrat with French ancestry, and one of Wilbur Wright’s students. However, Lambert was injured in a major crash during a test flight, forcing him to quit the competition. On July 25, 1909, the three rivals each arrived on the shores of Calais, France. Blériot had a badly burned foot when a gasoline line broke on his #VIII machine during one of his trial runs, although he did not withdraw.[6] The #VIII was Bleriot’s largest & most successful design up to the #XI. After his crash in the #VIII which left him with the burnt foot, the #XI was the only other aircraft he had available to make the
Blériot had two rivals for the prize, both of whom failed to reach the goal. The first was Hubert Latham, a French national of English extraction. He was favored by both the United Kingdom and France to win. He had arrived first and attempted to fly across on 19 July of that year, but six miles (10 km) from the shore at Dover he developed engine trouble and was forced to make a sea landing. The other pilot, Charles de Lambert, was a Russian aristocrat with French ancestry, and one of Wilbur Wright’s students. However, Lambert was injured in a major crash during a test flight, forcing him to quit the competition. On July 25, 1909, the three rivals each arrived on the shores of Calais, France. Blériot had a badly burned foot when a gasoline line broke on his #VIII machine during one of his trial runs, although he did not withdraw.[6] The #VIII was Bleriot’s largest & most successful design up to the #XI. After his crash in the #VIII which left him with the burnt foot, the #XI was the only other aircraft he had available to make the Channel flight.Channel flight.

Genuine Bleriot to cross Channel

The collection owns a genuine Bleriot Type XI, built in 1909 by Louis Bleriot himself. The aircraft is in wholly original condition, aside from having been re-covered, and having a small main undercarriage modification; and has its original Anzani 3 cylinder motor. The aircraft has been in Shuttleworth hands since 1935 and has been maintained in flying condition since 1936, when it was flown by Richard Shuttleworth himself at the Royal Air Force Display. Since then it has appeared at many air displays both before and after the Second World War.
Because of the low power and the uncertainty that the motor will continue to run for more than a couple of minutes at full power, the flying of the aircraft is limited to hops lasting the length of the airfield only. Let us now look at this fascinating machine in detail, and see what a typical flight consisting of three of these hopsisjike.
The aircraft is a wire-braced monoplane, with single tail and rudder surfaces. The wings are heavily cambered and are supported by king posts above and below the centre section. Through this structure also go the wires which are used to warp the wings for lateral control. The fuselage is an open lattice construction of wood, wire braced; and the pilot sits in a splendidly uncomfortable wickerwork seat just abeam the wing trailing edge. As a concession to decency, the sides and bottom of the fuselage are covered with a loose canvas snap-on cover as far back as the seat, but aft of this, where side covers would help to supplement directional stability, they are absent. There is no fin, and the rudder is extremely small. The tailplane is unusual in that it also has heavy positive camber and that the inboard portion is fixed. The elevators are mounted outboard of this fixed portion and comprise the whole tip each side. They are hinged roughly at mid-chord and have a very large range of movement. The undercarriage is a tailwheel design, with
The collection owns a genuine Bleriot (Channel) Type XI, built in 1909 by Louis Bleriot himself. The aircraft is in wholly original condition, aside from having been re-covered, and having a small main undercarriage modification; and has its original Anzani 3 cylinder motor. The aircraft has been in Shuttleworth hands since 1935 and has been maintained in flying condition since 1936, when it was flown by Richard Shuttleworth himself at the Royal Air Force Display. Since then it has appeared at many air displays both before and after the Second World War.
Because of the low power and the uncertainty that the motor will continue to run for more than a couple of minutes at full power, the flying of the aircraft is limited to hops lasting the length of the airfield only. Let us now look at this fascinating machine in detail, and see what a typical flight consisting of three of these hopsisjike.
The aircraft is a wire-braced monoplane, with single tail and rudder surfaces. The wings are heavily cambered and are supported by king posts above and below the centre section. Through this structure also go the wires which are used to warp the wings for lateral control. The fuselage is an open lattice construction of wood, wire braced; and the pilot sits in a splendidly uncomfortable wickerwork seat just abeam the wing trailing edge. As a concession to decency, the sides and bottom of the fuselage are covered with a loose canvas snap-on cover as far back as the seat, but aft of this, where side covers would help to supplement directional stability, they are absent. There is no fin, and the rudder is extremely small. The tailplane is unusual in that it also has heavy positive camber and that the inboard portion is fixed. The elevators are mounted outboard of this fixed portion and comprise the whole tip each side. They are hinged roughly at mid-chord and have a very large range of movement. The undercarriage is a tailwheel design, with bungee springing, and has the unusual feature that all three wheels castor freely, against a light spring force.
The pilot’s controls are a little peculiar to the modern eye, but they work in a conventional fashion. The control column is pivoted at its base, and moves in the normal sense for lateral and longitudinal control, but to confuse the issue it has a large fat-rimmed wheel mounted flat on top, which has no function other than to act as a handgrip, and does not turn or do anything else interesting. The rudder bar is smooth wood with no foot restraint, and operates over an uncomfortably large range, so that in use the pilot risks sprained ankles, or worse still a loss of control when one foot slips completely off. What passes for the throttle is mounted on the right-hand side of the control column, beneath the wheel, and is, in fact, the ignition advance and retard. This works in the reverse sense from normal in that pulling it aft towards the pilot increases power, and vice-versa. To complicate the issue, it has a ratchet which locks it on and which has to be released before power can be reduced. This successfully governs the motor from a slow tick-over at about 300 rpm to its maximum of about 1,000 rpm; at which, in its present condition, it yields just about enough of its normal 25 bhp to lift the aircraft off the ground and to fly at about 10 feet in ground effect.
The motor is a three cylinder fan formation, with the included angle of the outside pair roughly 120°. Construction is approximate, to say the least, and the angle between each barrel and its neighbour is different, which makes timing something of a problem. Lubrication is by a total loss castor oil system, fed through an adjustable feed cock from a pressurized tank. The tank pressure is pilot-generated by a hand pump, and of course, feed rate tends to vary with pressure; although the aim, if a hand can be spared, is to maintain 2 psi. Each cylinder barrel has a ring of ventilation holes cut about half-way down the stroke, so that the exhaust gases can be vented direct to the air, in addition to a normal exhaust pipe from the head. This feature, intended to supplement the inadequate exhaust valves, is useful in that combustion can be seen, and mixture strength thereby checked, and very nearly lethal in that it guarantees that the pilot operates throughout in a haze of castor oil mist and exhaust fumes. Having extremely uneven firing intervals, the motor has to have an enormously heavy crankshaft cum flywheel, in addition to the propeller, and even with this the vibration level is high. However, the airframe is so flexible that this scarcely matters in the structural sense, but the pilot is aware of it from time to time as his vision blurs perceptibly. An exhaust valve lifter, necessary to stop the motor, an ignition switch and a fuel cock quite out of the pilot’s reach complete the cockpit picture. Note, if you will, that no instruments at all are fitted aside from the tank pressure gauge.
The first problem that faces the Bleriot pilot is how to get in. The one footstep provided is way out of reach, and every time he leans on the aircraft or catches hold of it to try to climb in, it is apt to sidle away on its castoring undercarriage. Getting in is one of the most difficult parts of the flight, and one sometimes wonders if it ought not to be made impossible. A ladder and a helpful engineer are the solution, however, and once in only the discomfort, exposure and the fact that most things are out of reach are disconcerting. The next stage, the ritual of starting, can now begin.
Bleriot fly your plane

Bleriot fly your plane

Since the carburettor is always full open, liberal flooding is necessary, together with priming into the inlet ports, before a start can be considered likely. The trembler coil ignition is then connected to its batteries, and the propeller turned over a few blades to suck the mixture in. Meantime, to take his mind off the fuel pouring out of the carburetter, the pilot pressurizes the oil tank and sets the advance and retard about one-third from the most retarded position. The propeller is now set carefully on compression and, on a call of ‘contact’ from the engineer doing the start, the pilot switches on the single ignition switch. The propeller is swung and, if everything has been done correctly, and the old girl feels like it, the motor fires and we are in business. A blast of cold air comes back from the propeller and at once the pilot has to lower his goggles. Shortly after, the first of the second-hand castor oil begins to arrive in the cockpit area, and the feed is adjusted so as not to oil up the plugs. At this stage the ignition is advanced so as to increase power and make sure that all the cylinders fire and get warm. For some reason, there is a lazy pot on this Anzani — the starboard one — and if it is run for any length of time from cold on two, the third will never cut in. We then have to stop the motor and change the plug for a hot one and try again. It is better to avoid this rigmarole if possible as there is no guarantee it will fire at all the second time, and the engineers do not like it. Once satisfactorily warmed, however, a brief run-up is done to check by ear that all is well, and again to adjust the oil feed; then power is reduced, the chocks waved away, and we are ready to taxi.
The Bleriot is never flown in winds in excess of five knots for reasons of low control power, and for the same reasons we also only taxi in light winds or flat calm. Even so, directional control is so poor that wing handlers are required to do more than taxi in a straight line, or to negotiate any sloping ground. The sloping ground problem arises from the fact that all wheels castor freely, against the weak spring centring system, and so the system generates virtually no side force. Put the aircraft sideways on a slope and it will set off sideways downward at once, unless the pilot can turn it to head up the gradient, and with poor directional control this is often not possible. With understanding handling, the main taxying problem becomes keeping the motor running hard enough to prevent plug-oiling without achieving too high a speed, and not prolonging the process so much that the motor overheats.
Louis Bleriot plane

Louis Bleriot plane

Because of the poor directional control, no attempt is made to take off crosswind, irrespective of runway direction. With the aircraft lined up exactly into wind, therefore, one of the handlers holds on to the tail and the motor is run-up to full power, and the oil pressure and feed-rate checked. When all is to his satisfaction, the pilot raises one arm, holds it out parallel with the ground, then drops it smartly to his side. Upon this signal the handler releases the tail, the aircraft rolls gently forward, and the flight is about to begin.
In the few seconds before the aircraft reaches flying speed, the pilot has an opportunity to check the oil feed and by the clouds of oil rushing past him decide perhaps to vary the rate or not. The decision is a hard one, because time is short and the oil cock very nearly out of reach. Assuming all is well, however, and the pilot can still see through his goggles, the tail is raised as a fast walking pace is achieved, and at a slightly nose up flying attitude the gentle acceleration continues until the aircraft lifts itself off the ground. No airspeed indicator is fitted, but 25 mph is probably a fair estimate of flying speed for this aircraft. Even at this modest pace the airfield looks extremely small, and once a wheel height of ten feet or more is achieved, smaller still. The first priority is therefore when and how one is going to get it down again, and unless the pilot is careful the first flight is apt to be over before he has had time even to consider the question of how the aircraft handles. The most striking impression of the aircraft is the large elevator hinge moment, in the nose up sense, which requires a constant 10 lb push force on the stick to hold level flight. A moment’s inattention and the aircraft will abruptly pitch up, and be a great deal higher and be flying a great deal more slowly than the pilot would wish. Luckily, the elevator control is relatively powerful and precise. This high and slow situation cannot be maintained, however, as the motor gives insufficient power to fly out of ground effect and provided prompt action is taken to prevent a possible stall, no harm is done and the aircraft sinks sedately back down to a wheel height of about twenty feet. By this time most of the airfield will undoubtedly have been used up, and it will be time to land, and to begin the long taxi back to the start point for the next hop. As we have never stalled the aircraft, either deliberately, because we cannot achieve a safe height to do so and because the aircraft is virtually priceless, nor accidentally, nothing is known about its behaviour in this regime.
During the next take-off the pilot notices that the elevator push force develops very early in the roll and that once the tail is lifted, a slight relaxing of this forward pressure will allow the wheels to leave the ground a little earlier than if the aircraft is left to itself, and so save precious distance for the flight. There is a limit to the gain to be had from this technique, however, and should the incidence increase too much, acceleration is slowed and the distance once again increases. The best conditions seem to occur at a point just about when the tailwheel would begin to touch. Once airborne again, the heavy vibration is noticed, and a glance at the blurred structure shows just how out of balance the motor is. It is time now, however, to explore the control power, before we run out of airfield, and to see where the limits of controllability might be expected to lie. A small lateral input each way shows that roll power is low, and one rapidly progresses to full deflection, and this yields a delayed and very low roll rate which is also very difficult to stop. At this stage it is apparent that any gust-induced roll disturbance is going to be very difficult to handle, and that some help will clearly be necessary. Therefore, rudder inputs are tried, so as to generate sideslip, and to see if this induces a roll rate. The rudder itself is also found to be weak, even with full slipstream over it, and although sideslip does eventually result, the secondary roll rate developed by it is also very low. It is now clear that the major problem axis of the aircraft is the roll, with directional following it a close second, and we redouble our determination not to fly other than in calm conditions. Once again, however, the end of the airfield approaches and it is time to land.
During the taxi back to the other end of the airfield, it is apparent that a slight wind has got up, and directional control of the aircraft becomes awkward, giving the handler a hard time keeping the direction constant. Also, the motor is showing signs of overheating, so the oil rate is increased slightly and tank pressure restored to 2 psi. Fuel is still not a problem, as we started out with five gallons, which should last for a couple of hours or more, and the sight glass in the tank confirms this. Now also the continuous exhaust fumes are starting to have an effect, and the pilot is covered with a thin film of castor oil. Before the next hop, the goggles must definitely be cleaned, and it is also decided that this will be the last hop in this series, and that on this mainly the landing will be explored.
In the air again, it is soon obvious that the power from the motor is decreasing and that the first landing is coming up fairly soon, like it or not; and that there may not be power available for a second. Nevertheless, rather than let the aircraft sink on itself, power is reduced, and it is surprising how quickly one has got used to the reversed sense of the power lever. At once the nose pitches up again as the slipstream reduces, and with a smart forward stick input the descent is started. The touch-down follows seconds later, and it is a relief to be able to release the forward pressure on the control column for a second. The geometry of the machine is such that without even trying, a three-point landing results, and there is therefore no need to lower the tail. The disadvantage is that as soon as power is reduced in these circumstances, directional stability also is reduced sharply and controlling the roll-out becomes a full-time task. The castoring undercarriage, so soft and gentle in touch-down, now becomes an additional hindrance because even if the aircraft heading can be changed, the lack of sideforce on the mainwheels means that probably the machine will simply crab and maintain its original direction. Opposite wing warp sometimes helps, but in the extreme the pilot has to take refuge in the low speed and just to hope that the thing will stop before he hits anything. In the interests of flight safety we have limited the castoring ability to a fraction of its original value by a wire tie, but the problem still exists.
Power is at once applied again, however, to attempt another hop and landing, and proves to be still sufficient to lift the aircraft a foot or two off the ground. Since distance is very limited, an immediate and final landing is called for, and so for an experiment this time power is abruptly reduced to the idle setting of about one-third advance. The result is an instantaneous speed loss and a much more crisp pitch-up than before. Before there is time to counteract this, the aircraft has landed again, untidily, a little tail-wheel first. Also, a fairly abrupt swing has developed which needs full rudder and a little burst of power to correct, but all is well, and the gentle roll-out is completed some 100 yards short of the boundary, where the handlers turn the aircraft round for the journey back to the flight line. Plainly, the gentle reduction technique is, as expected, the best, and this is obviously the one to be used in the future.
The feeling of well-being and worthwhileness which is always present after a successful flight is never more obvious than now. Not only have we flown, but we have had the unique pnvilege of flying a genuine Bleriot monoplane, in very nearly the exact configuration and circumstances that Louis Bleriot himself might have done. With all its peculiarities and shortcomings, this has been as it always is, a wonderful experience. It is true that wing warping will never replace the aileron, and that one has been smothered in oil, and breathed exhaust fumes for half the time, but this has not detracted one bit from the delight. One can only be grateful for the experience, and wonder at the courage and resource of a man who could design and build such a machine, and eventually attempt and conquer the Channel in it.

Louis Blériot

Louis Blériot

Bleriot was the first to fly a heavier -than-air aircraft across the Channel. His pioneering flight was in 1909, only 6 years after the first powered flight by the Wright brothers in the USA. He flew his monoplane from the beach west of Calais, which was re-named ‘Bleriot-plage'; and landed on a hillside meadow by Dover Castle, which has since become woodland.
He was born in Cambrai, and later lived in Hardelot, where he was a director of the property company developing the resort, and a keen pioneer of sandyachting in Hardelot. He went on to design many successful aircraft.
Louis Bleriot

Louis Bleriot

Louis Bleriot (French aviator) was the first to fly a heavier -than-air aircraft across the Channel. His pioneering flight was in 1909, only 6 years after the first powered flight by the Wright brothers in the USA. He flew his monoplane from the beach west of Calais, which was re-named ‘Bleriot-plage'; and landed on a hillside meadow by Dover Castle, which has since become woodland.

He was born in Cambrai (France), and later lived in Hardelot, where he was a director of the property company developing the resort, and a keen pioneer of sandyachting in Hardelot. He went on to design many successful aircraft.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-k67d45RwR0